Heather Buchman, Department Chair
315-859-4353
315-859-4568 (fax)
Office: List 233

 

Senior Program in Music

Music concentrators fulfill the Senior Program in Music by completing Mus 452 in the Spring of the senior year.  Each student in 452 works on a specific topic chosen from among those offered by members of the department.  (Past topics have included analysis of Beethoven piano sonatas, editing Renaissance manuscripts, orchestration projects, and a study of jazz drumming styles.)  More than one student may work within the same general topic.  In addition to intensive work with the faculty member leading the topic, all students in 452 will meet as a group with members of the department regularly throughout the semester.

Honors Senior Projects

Students who are eligible for Honors in music (those who have at least a 90 average in their coursework that counts toward the concentration) may be invited by the Department to complete a two-semester Honor’s project, Mus 550-51, instead of Mus 452.  Honors Projects would be chosen in areas of particular interest: composition, conducting, history/theory/ethnomusicology, jazz performance, or solo performance (see descriptions below).  Any student contemplating this possibility should, early in the junior year, seek advice from a full-time member of the music faculty who would likely advise the Honors Project should an invitation be made.  In the Spring semester of the senior year, students enrolled in Mus 551 will meet jointly with Mus 452 in the regular meetings with members of the department.

In the case of Honors projects, prior to the time of the final presentation of the project (with the exception of Composition and Solo Performance which have their own procedures), a second reader or auditor will be selected to respond to and grade the project.  Basic timetables and requirements for particular areas of interest are given below;  note that dates are for finished products and missed deadlines will result in a reduced grade for the project.  Further, the dates listed are for senior projects completed in the Spring semester of the Senior year.  Dates will be adjusted by the department chair for Fall semester presentations of Senior Projects.

Composition

A student who wishes to undertake a senior project in composition must have taken Mus 368 (Seminar in Musical Composition) prior to the senior year.  If the presentation of the project involves the production of a recording, then the student must also have taken Mus 277 (Music in Contemporary Media) prior to the senior year.  If the project is a sound installation, the student should also have taken Mus 377 (Electronic Arts Workshop).  If the project is a recital of compositions, the student must have previously presented an original composition on at least one departmentally-sponsored Student Concert in Wellin Hall or on a concert by a college ensemble directed by a full-time member of the music faculty.

1) A senior project in composition can take one of many forms:

a) a set of compositions produced in the Digital Music Studio and distributed to the audience as a compact disc recording
b)  a set of compositions for acoustic and/or electroacoustic instruments and performed for the audience in a recital
c) a substantial work for a college ensemble that is performed by this group on at least one of its public concerts
d) a sound installation that is presented to the audience in a public space for a period of at least several days
e) some combination of the above

2) All students who do a senior project in composition are expected to write a short paper (5-10 pages) on influences, analysis, and historical perspective.
3)  Deadlines are:

a) Junior year
November 1: statement of intent approved by faculty advisor and delivered to the chair of the department (must be accompanied by a Recital Proposal form if the student plans a recital of compositions).
December 1:  A student who wishes to present a recital of compositions must reserve the date and space for the recital with the Performing Arts Administrator.
March 1:   A student who wishes to compose a work for a college ensemble must provide the director of the ensemble with scores and recordings of previously composed works and a description of the proposed work.
March 31: A student who wishes to compose a work for a college ensemble must obtain from the director of the ensemble a statement that includes a commitment to perform the work, a deadline for the receipt of performance materials, and a tentative date for the premiere performance.
March 31: draft of project proposal to faculty advisor
April 15: completed project proposal approved by faculty advisor, to the department chair; the department will consider the proposal and respond with a decision by May 1

b) Senior year
December 1:  A student who wishes to present a sound installation must schedule the time and space for the installation, including a brief (15-20 minute) presentation at the opening of the work.
March 1:  A student who wishes to produce a compact disc recording of original compositions produced in the studio must have the master disc and project art complete and ready to deliver to the production company.  Also by this date the student must schedule a time and place to release the recording to the public and make a brief (15-20 minute) presentation about it.
April 15:  paper due

For a student who wishes to present a recital of compositions:
Eight weeks prior to the recital:  A draft of program copy and program notes must be delivered to the faculty advisor.
Two weeks prior to recital:  The program copy and program notes approved by the faculty advisor must be delivered electronically to the Academic Office Assistant for the music department.
Failure to meet deadlines will reduce the grade for the project.

4) The senior project proposal (the draft of which is due to the faculty advisor by March 31 of the junior year) should include:

a) a list and brief description of previous compositions or installations completed, including durations and instrumentation (if applicable)
b) a tentative timeline for the project
c) If the project will involve a set of compositions presented on a recording, provide a tentative list of the works to be included and a brief description of their characteristics (duration, techniques to be employed, etc.)
d) If the project will involve a recital of compositions, provide a tentative list of the works to be included and a brief description of their characteristics (e.g., duration, instrumentation, techniques, etc.). The program may include works already completed, provided they do not account altogether for more than half of the total duration of the music on the program.
e) If the project will involve the creation of a work for a college ensemble, attach the statement of commitment from the ensemble director.
f) If the project will be a sound installation, provide a tentative description of the characteristics of the work (degree of interaction with the space and the audience, techniques applied, etc.) and a tentative list of resources that will be required.

5) For projects that involve the presentation of a set of compositions on a recording and for sound installation projects, the chair of the department will request a second evaluation from a member of the full time faculty, in addition to that of the principal faculty advisor for the project, when determining the final grade.  For projects that involve the creation of a substantial work for a college ensemble, the department chair will request an evaluation of the work from the ensemble director, in addition to that of the principal faculty advisor, when determining the final grade. 

For projects that involve a recital of compositions, the principal faculty advisor will arrange for a pre-recital presentation of the works before a panel of music faculty (possibly including part-time faculty) to take place three weeks prior to the scheduled public recital.  The instructors will grade the presentation and approve or disapprove the recital and individual works on the recital. Should the panel decide that a student may not present one or more works on the recital, the grade for the senior project will be reduced.

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Conducting

A student who wishes to pursue conducting as a senior project must have assisted with conducting in one of the large ensembles for at least one semester of the junior year, and assist in conducting in one of the large ensembles for the entire senior year.  Students who wish to do a project in choral conducting should have studied voice privately at the college for at least four semesters and should be a member of the college choir. Students who wish to do a project in orchestral conducting should have studied their instrument privately at the college for at least four semesters and should be a member of the college orchestra.  Student performance in Mus 216 will be the primary criterion for obtaining approval from the faculty advisor to pursue a senior program in conducting.
1) The components of the senior program in conducting are:

a) public performance of about one-half hour in length as a conductor in a concert during the senior year.  A conductor must recruit a chamber ensemble, select works from a variety of historical periods and styles, prepare the ensemble during twelve hours of rehearsal, and conduct the ensemble in a public performance.  Conducting a college ensemble in a public performance may fulfill only part of the public performance requirement.
b) program notes for the works the student is conducting
c) paper (about 20-25 pages) on the influences, analysis, and historical perspective of the works the student plans to conduct in the senior year

2) Deadlines are:

a) Junior year
November 1: statement of intent and completed Recital Proposal Form, available in the department office, approved by studio instructor and faculty advisor and delivered to the chair of the department
December 1: reserve date for public recital with the Performing Arts Administrator, to be scheduled no later than April 15 of the senior year
April 15: completed project proposal, approved by faculty advisor and solo performance instructor, to the department chair; the department will consider the proposal and respond with a decision by May 1.  The completed project proposal must include a preliminary list of the repertoire to be conducted.
b) Senior year
Last day of classes for the fall semester: final paper, draft of program copy, and program notes to faculty advisor
Two weeks prior to recital: disk of program copy and program notes to Performing Arts Administrator
April 15: last date for public recital

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History/Theory/Ethnomusicology

Students who wish to pursue a senior project in music history, theory, or ethnomusicology should have completed their course work in the relevant area prior to the senior year (for History: Mus 251, 252, 253;  for Theory: Mus 209, 210;  for Ethnomusicology: Mus 154, Mus 254).
1) The components of the senior program in history/theory/ethnomusicology are:

a) major paper (35-50 pages) or equivalent collection of shorter essays after the model of a Norton Critical Score involving, at a minimum, some historical contexts, some theoretical analysis, and some discussion of performance practice or recorded performances;
b) oral presentation at a departmental seminar of no more than 1 hour including the question/answer session.

2) The oral presentation may include the performance by the student of examples to illustrate points within the paper.  However, the presentation should in no way be construed to be a recital or a half recital, and entire works or movements of works will not normally be included in the presentation.
3) Deadlines are:

a) Junior year
November 1: statement of intent approved by faculty advisor and delivered to the chair of the department
December 1: reserve date for oral presentation with the Performing Arts Administrator, to be scheduled no later than April 15 of the senior year
April 15: completed project proposal approved by faculty advisor to the department chair; the department will consider the proposal and respond with a decision by May 1
b) Senior year
March 31: paper due
April 15: last date for oral presentation

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Jazz Performance

A student who wishes to pursue jazz performance as a senior project must have performed on his or her instrument(s) during two student concerts – or one student concert and one jazz ensemble concert in which a student has a major solo – prior to the end of the sophomore year.  The student must also take one-hour solo performance courses in his or her instrument(s) throughout the junior and senior years, and must perform on his or her instrument(s) during at least two student concerts – or one student concert and one jazz ensemble concert in which a student has a major solo – after the sophomore year and prior to the senior recital.  At least one of those two student or jazz ensemble concerts after the sophomore year must be during the junior year.  In addition, prior to the senior year, the student must complete Mus 160, 213, and jazz improvisation.
1) The components of the senior program in solo performance are:

a) public recital; repertoire should include swing, ballad, Latin, and even-eighth selections as well as an original composition and an original arrangement
b) pre-recital jury before a panel of three solo performance, to take place three weeks prior to the scheduled public recital.  The instructors will grade the jury, and approve or disapprove the recital and individual works on the recital.  The jury grade will comprise 1/3 of the senior project’s final grade.  Should the panel decide that a student may not perform one or more works on the recital, the grade for the senior project will be reduced.  The jury will begin with a work chosen by the student.  After that, the panel of instructors may request works or parts of works as it deems appropriate.  Any work to be performed from memory on the recital must be performed from memory during the jury. If the three week deadline for this jury falls at a time when the college is not in session, the jury must take place prior to the college break.
c) program notes, in final form and handed in at the jury
d) short paper (5-10 pages) on influences, analysis, and historical perspective of one or more works on the senior recital

2) Recitalists who wish to perform works that involve other student musicians (excluding staff pianists) may only consider students who meet the performance criteria for presenting a recital;  i.e., the student must have appeared on at least two Student Concerts and must be studying privately at the college or participating in a departmental ensemble in the semester of the recital.  This student must also perform at the pre-recital jury at an appropriate level.  Finally, the student must have the consent of his/her studio instructor or ensemble conductor and the instructor of the recitalist.
3) Deadlines are:

a) Junior year
November 1: completed Recital Proposal Form, available in the department office, approved by studio instructor and faculty advisor and delivered to the chair of the department
December 1: reserve date for public recital with the Performing Arts Administrator, to be scheduled no later than April 15 of the senior year
April 15: completed project proposal, approved by faculty advisor and solo performance instructor, to the department chair; the department will consider the proposal and respond with a decision by May 1.  The completed project proposal must include a preliminary list of the repertoire to be performed.
b) Senior year
Eight weeks prior to recital: draft of program copy and program notes to faculty advisor; drafts of original composition and arrangement
Three weeks prior to recital: pre-recital jury;  final and completed program copy and program notes handed into jury
Two weeks prior to recital: disk of program copy and program notes;  completed original composition and arrangement
March 31: paper due
April 15: last date for public recital

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Solo Performance

A student who wishes to pursue solo performance as a senior project must have performed on his or her instrument(s) during two Student Concerts (which may include one college ensemble concert in which a student has a major solo) prior to the end of the sophomore year, must take one-hour solo performance courses in his or her instrument(s) throughout the junior and senior years, and must perform on his or her instrument(s) during at least two Student Concerts (which may include one college ensemble concert in which a student has a major solo) after the sophomore year and prior to the senior recital.  At least one of those two Student Concerts after the sophomore year must be during the junior year.  The student must work with a full-time faculty member of the department when writing program notes and the paper for the senior recital.
1) The components of the senior program in solo performance are:

a) public recital; repertoire should include music from at least three historical periods and, for singers, include at least three languages. The studio instructor will assign a grade for the recital that will comprise 1/3 of the senior project’s final grade.
b) pre-recital jury before a panel of three solo performance, to take place three weeks prior to the scheduled public recital.  The instructors will grade the jury, and approve or disapprove the recital and individual works on the recital.  The jury grade will comprise 1/3 of the senior project’s final grade.  Should the panel decide that a student may not perform one or more works on the recital, the grade for the senior project will be reduced.  The jury will begin with a work chosen by the student.  After that, the panel of instructors may request works or parts of works as it deems appropriate.  Any work to be performed from memory on the recital must be performed from memory during the jury. If the three week deadline for this jury falls at a time when the college is not in session, the jury must take place prior to the college break.
c) program notes, in final form and handed in at the jury
d) paper (approximately 10 pages), which is an interpretive analysis on a major multi-movement work or a group of shorter works that includes analysis and historical perspective directed toward a better performance. The faculty advisor will assign a grade for the paper and notes that will comprise 1/3 of the senior project’s final grade.

2) Recitalists who wish to perform works that involve other student musicians (excluding staff pianists) may only consider students who meet the performance criteria for presenting a recital;  i.e., the student must have appeared on at least two Student Concerts and must be studying privately at the college or participating in a departmental ensemble in the semester of the recital.  This student must also perform at the pre-recital jury at an appropriate level.  Finally, the student must have the consent of his/her studio instructor or ensemble conductor and the instructor of the recitalist.
3) Deadlines are:

a) Junior year
November 1: completed Recital Proposal Form, available in the department office, approved by studio instructor and faculty advisor and delivered to the chair of the department
December 1: reserve date for public recital with the Performing Arts Administrator, to be scheduled no later than April 15 of the senior year
April 15: completed project proposal, approved by faculty advisor and solo performance instructor, to the department chair; the department will consider the proposal and respond with a decision by May 1.  The completed project proposal must include a preliminary list of the repertoire to be performed.
b) Senior year
September 15: Final list of repertoire must be submitted to department chair
Eight weeks prior to recital: draft of program copy and program notes to faculty advisor
Three weeks prior to recital: pre-recital jury;  final and completed program copy and program notes handed into jury
Two weeks prior to recital: final disk of program copy and program notes handed into Performing Arts Administrator
March 31: paper due
April 15: last date for public recital

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